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DAUGHTERS OF THE PROPHET

Posted on December 13, 2015 at 2:05 AM Comments comments (0)

ZAYNAB (r.a) – DAUGHTER OF MUHAMMAD (صلى الله عليه وسلم)

Zaynab (R.A.) was the eldest of the four daughters of Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam). Zaynab (R.A.) was married to Abdul As ibn Rabi, who was also the first cousin of Zaynab (R.A.), son of Khadija’s (R.A.) sister Hala. After Prophethood her husband did not accept Islãm and the leaders of his clan put great pressure upon him to divorce her and in return promised him to arrange the bride of his choice. But he didn’t.

Later Zaynab (R.A.) went to Madinah with other emigrants. Abdul As let her go with a heavy heart. The news of her journey leaked and some miscreants of the Quraysh followed them to bring her back. One of them, Habbãr by name, galloped ahead brandishing his spear. Zaynab (R.A.) was troubled much by his arrival. The camel, she was mounted on was startled and she fell down from her howdah (carriage). She was expecting her third child and later she had a miscarriage.

Not long after Hijrah, Abdul As came to Madinah and embraced Islãm. His wife Zaynab (R.A.) ever praying to Allah that He may turn his heart to Islãm owing to the deep love between the spouses, was grateful to Allah. The Prophet (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) allowed his daughter Zaynab (R.A.) to reinstate the suspended bond of marriage.

source: Attarbiyah Magazine

 

 

DAUGHTERS OF THE PROPHET

Posted on December 12, 2015 at 3:00 AM Comments comments (0)

DAUGHTERS OF THE PROPHET

UMME KULTHUM (r.a) – DAUGHTER OF MUHAMMAD (صلى الله عليه وسلم)

Umme Kulthum (R.A) was Rasulullah’s (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) third daughter. She too, was married like her sister to the son of Abu Lahab, Utaiba. Utaiba too like his brother, divorced Umme Khulthum (R.A).

When her elder sister Ruqayyah (R.A) passed away, Umme Kulthum was given in marriage to Uthman (R.A.).

A narratable situation had arisen on that occasion.

Hafsa (R.A) the daughter of Umar (R.A) had become a widow when she was only 18 years old. Umar (R.A) offered Uthman (R.A) to take her in marriage who was very disconsolate after the death of Ruqayyah but he refused. Umar (R.A) was hurt by his refusal.

He then went to Abu Bakr (R.A) whom he counted as his best friend and made to him the same offer. His evasive answer disappointed him even more.

Umar (R.A) went to Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) and gave vent to his grievance. Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) said to him, “Behold! I will show you a better son-in-law than Uthman, and I will show him a better father-in-law than you.” “So be it.” said Sayyidinah Umar (R.A) with a glee on his face.

Umar (R.A) in a moment’s reflection found that the better man referred to was none other than Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) who would himself take Hafsa (R.A) in his marriage and who would become, for the second time the father-in-law of Uthman (R.A) by giving him in marriage Ruqayyah’s (R.A) sister Umme Kulthum (R.A).

source: Attarbiyah Magazine

 

 

 

 

 

 


DAUGHTERS OF THE PROPHET

Posted on December 12, 2015 at 2:20 AM Comments comments (0)

RUQAYYAH (R.A)


RUQAYYAH (r.a) – DAUGHTER OF MUHAMMAD (صلى الله عليه وسلم)

Ruqayyah (R.A.) was Rasulullah’s (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) second daughter. She was married to Utba the son of Abu Lahab. Abu Lahab was the uncle of Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) but had become his violent enemy and of Islãm and its followers.

Both father and son did not enter into Islãm and Utba repudiated Ruqayyah (R.A.) on the incitement of his father. Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) gave Ruqayyah (R.A.) in marriage to Uthman ibn Affãn (R.A.).

When the battle of Badr took place, Ruqayyah (R.A.) was seriosly ill. Uthman (R.A.) had the desire to fight but Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) asked him to stay at home and take care of his sick wife. He told him that he would be rewarded equal to the participants. He marked him ’Fighter of Badr’ and gave him his share in the booty.

Ruqayyah (R.A.) passed away on the day the Muslims returned victorious.

source: Attarbiyah Magazine

 

 

 

 


Daughters of the Prophet

Posted on December 11, 2015 at 2:15 AM Comments comments (0)

Daughters of the Prophet



FATIMAH TUZ ZAHRAH (r.a) – DUAGHTER OF MUHAMMAD (صلى الله عليه وسلم)

Fatimah (R.A.) was youngest in age of all her sisters but highest in grades. She was dearest to her father of all his daughters. He once said, “Fatimah is like soul and heart to me.” once, he said, “Fatimah will be the leader of the women in Paradise.” he further said, “What troubles Fatimah troubles me as well.”

It was the sixth year of Prophethood and Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) had launched his preaching mission but his own clan were impeding in his way. The people of the Quraysh were trying every trick to trouble him. One day while he was performing Salãh in the Haram, on the instigation of the pagans of Makkak, Aqabah ibn Moeet brought the entrails of a camel and placed it on his neck whilst he was prostrating. Someone told Fatimah (R.A.) who was then just six years old. She came running and removed the stuff and cursed the non-believers. She, at such an early age beheld the tribulations and torments Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) was being subject to.

Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) awarded her the title of ‘lady of Paradise’.

It has been reported that Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) once said, “On the Day of Resurrection a voice will be heard saying ‘ lower you heads, Fatimah bint Muhammad is being escorted along,’ then Fatimah will cross the pathway to Paradise in a flash leading seventy thousand Hoors (heavenly women).”

Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) confided only to Fatimah (R.A.) during his last days that he would die of his illness. She wept to hear that but Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) whispered to her that she would follow him which brought delight on her face and she smiled.

Rasulullah’s (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) beloved wives pressed her much to disclose that secret, but she didn’t. She revealed it, however after his demise.

source: Attarbiyah Magazine

 

 

 

 

 


A MESSAGE TO UNIVERSITY GRADUATES

Posted on December 10, 2015 at 3:15 AM Comments comments (0)

A MESSAGE TO UNIVERSITY GRADUATES

Earlier this week I was part of a group that was invited to attend a University Graduation ceremony. Someone dear to me will also be graduating soon and some very good general advice was given at the ceremony I attended, so I decided to write this little message up to Muslim University Graduates.

Graduation day is the culmination of 3-5 years of studying a particular subject in depth at degree level. You have spent these years studying because you realise that education is a means to attaining a good career and perceive it to lead to a better way of life.

At this significant stage in your life, you are experiencing the transition from being a student through to a professional who will soon be working in the ‘real’ world. With this transition comes the need to prepare yourself in dealing with issues that may arise in the workplace, not due to trivialities such as race etc but mainly because of your religion.

Whilst many undergraduates become closer to their deen at university thanks to the efforts of ISOCs and associations, for those of us who will be going out into the workplace where their will be a minority muslim workforce or where contact with fellow muslims will be limited, it is especially vital for us to hold on to our deen; That is YOUR ISLAM.

If during your university days, you were unable to ‘get involved’ with the Muslim community, make this the starting point of change in your life.

“The one who treads a path seeking therein knowledge, Allah eases his path to the Garden.” [Sahih Muslim]

We must fully realise that our ultimate purpose in this dunya is to serve Allah Ta’ala and that our ultimate goal is to reach Jannah in the akhira (hereafter). Therefore your focus should now, be on adopting the means to achieve this eternal goal, i.e. adopting the teachings of Islam and following the Sunnah of our beloved messenger Muhammad (صلى الله عليه وسلم).

This does not mean that you have to become a hermit and retreat to some remote jungle to spend the rest of your days engaged in ibaadah. In fact we must live in the dunya but work for the akhira. What does this mean? This means that we must attempt to the best of our ability to seek deeni knowledge into at least the basic fundamentals of our religion. For example start from the basic fiqh of cleanliness and prayer and then move onto more advanced areas of the shariah such as the etiquettes of trading and business, especially for the field of work that you will soon enter into. You may also decide to study the fiqh of Nikaah and Talaaq because sooner or later if not already you will be approaching the stage where you will marry and eventually settle down with a family. These are just suggestions that hope to serve as an example of how YOU can tread that path to bring you closer to your Lord Allah Ta’ala and how you can balance the work of this world with the work of the akhira, Inshallah Ta’ala.

Whilst we have covered the importance of learning about our religion to benefit us in the hereafter, it is also necessary to learn about Islam so that we may be in a position to answer any questions that non-Muslim work colleagues may pose to us genuinely or out of curiosity.

Islam is in the spotlight; the media reports and the people see. Hence situations are bound to arise where you will be asked questions about Islam. It is therefore important that we should be equipped with the correct answers and teachings of Islam rather than substituting it with your own logic. Using your own logic in most cases will mean that you won’t be sharing the ‘true’ teachings and views of Islam and instead could be causing confusion and misinterpretation of our beautiful deen. Remember, what you say/ utter is what most people will think of Islam; so think before you speak.

Graduation also means that you have acquired a certain status in society as well as now being able to place certain letters after your name. One should, however, remember that in Islam there is no superiority of one over another except through taqwa.

“…Verily, the most honourable of you with Allah is that (believer) who has At-Taqwa. …” [Surah Hujurat V13]

Also, never look down upon anyone or let pride set into your heart as a result of your education. Any status we can obtain in the world is of no value whatsoever if Allah is displeased with us. Remember we should look at the people below us in the dunya, so that we may make shukr for what Allah Ta’ala has given us, and we should compete with the people above us in the matters of deen so that we may become closer to Allah Ta’ala.

After graduation some of you may return to your home town/ city whilst others remain living away from home to continue studies or work. We should reflect on how we travelled away from home to acquire our worldly education and if need be we must prepared to travel to acquire ‘deeni education’ and benefit also. We are aware of how our pious predecessors would travel years and years to obtain deeni knowledge, but that was a sacrifice that they were willing to make. We have vast arrays of modern technology to aid us, not only that; we have Masjids and Khanqahs where we can learn from the pious. Make the most of the means and resources that Allah Ta’ala has blessed you with.

I pray Allah Ta’ala fills our working lives with blessings and they are not a distraction to us from striving to achieve taqwa and, ultimately, jannah in the hereafter.

Jazakallah to Sister Mujahidah for her help in putting together this article.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


SURVIVING AT UNIVERSITY

Posted on December 9, 2015 at 7:10 PM Comments comments (0)

by a Muslim Brother

There were beer mats everywhere. The whole corridor was covered in an intriguing pattern of small cardboard squares called Carlsberg. There were eight rooms in the corridor but only one kitchen, one toilet and one shower. I had expected the place to be a bit more lively but my friend explained to me that it was always quiet on Friday and Saturday nights. ‘They invite me along with them as well,’ he said with a sigh, ‘but all I can do is laugh and politely decline.’

Welcome to the world of the university campus, the place where a significant number of Muslim students will spend at least the first year of their university life. Away from home and away from family and friends, the three years on average spent by most students pursuing a degree is a crucial time for the development or deterioration of one’s Imaan. All students whether they choose to remain at home or stay elsewhere experience the onslaught of ‘Fresher’s Week’ before they even begin their studies. Fresher’s Week is supposedly a week full of events designed to allow those beginning their university career to acquaint themselves with their new surroundings as well as with their fellow students. In reality Fresher’s Week is a hedonistic 7 days which the pubs and nightclubs utilise to attract their prospective clientele for the following year. Flyers and posters advertising nightclubs, bank loans, mobile phones and a whole host of other organisations, societies and clubs bombard students during these first few days. Even though the Islamic Societies of most universities make a determined effort to attract Muslim students away from such temptation, it is sad to say that for many Muslims the Islamic Society stall is last on their list of places to visit. Fresher’s Week is a severe trial and only those come through unscathed that have a strong bond and connection with Allah S.

When I initially applied to university I remember being told at college that university was a place of experimentation, of experience and of widening one’s views of the world. For a Muslim this experience can be extremely difficult as many of the activities used for this social experimentation are either makrooh or haram and illegal. Social experimentation and finding the ‘real you’ seem to be prime goals for many students. For Muslims, university can be quite a lonely time as many of the events and functions organised by their peers involve activities which are albeit legal under the laws of this country but illegal i.e. haram from an Islamic perspective. Promiscuous relationships, ‘pub crawls’ (whereby a number of pubs are visited in one outing) and a whole host of other unbelievable activities are the order of the day. And all this is practiced by those who the rest of society deems as being ‘the leaders of tomorrow’.

I remember my disgust when I initially visited my university at the lack of scope in the lecturer’s jokes. Alcohol and the price of alcohol were the only two topics discussed. It was quite a disturbing experience to be the only sombre person in a room full of 400 laughing 18 year olds. It was not that I did not understand the jokes, it was the fact that drinking and in reality alcoholism were deemed to be an acceptable part of the student lifestyle regardless of a person’s belief. In my opinion, this is the crux of the difficulty for Muslims studying at university; the question of maintaining and retaining a distinct Muslim identity. This is the point where many of us fail as we try to reconcile our faith with the demands and pressures of the environment surrounding us. Do you pray Zuhr Salaah during your lunch hour or do you make it Qadha and attend that lunchtime optional seminar which might look good on your CV? It is in such matters that students should turn to the ‘Ulamaa in order to find out how to reconcile these differences.

And it is during these times that one realises the true advantages of having a spiritual mentor. Having a spiritual mentor or Shaykh to which one can turn to for guidance and encouragement can make all the difference when confronted with a dilemma.

However, many students are unable to do this, mainly because of the fact that the only contact they had with the ‘Ulamaa was during their pre-teens when attending the evening maktab. No contact or relationship was maintained with the ‘Ulamaa and in many cases with the Deen of Islam after these initial few years. But, alhamdulillah there are still a significant number of students who do maintain contact, right until and after the time they enter university. Their knowledge and zeal for Islam can prove to be a boon for others searching for the truth – and there are many searching for and returning to the truth. The number of sudent reverts and Muslims whose interest in Islam is reignited while attending university and the existence of student Islamic Societies bears testimony to this.

Islamic Societies are voluntary organisations run by students to cater for the needs of Muslims who may be attending the university or living in its vicinity. They typically provide a prayer room with wudhoo facilities in most cases, and organise a variety of Da’wah and educational events. Partly funded by money from the university’s student union and partly by private donations, Islamic Societies bring together Muslims from around the world. In my first Jumu’ah prayer at university I was met with a scene which made me reminisce of how the times of the Prophet s must have been. The Imam was an African, the mu’azzin an Arab, and the remaining rows a mixture of Muslims from almost every other country in the world.

This diversity however, can prove to have a weakness in the sense that it can provide an ideal cover for deviant sects bent on spoiling the Imaan as well as ideology of Muslims. Many students are unaware of these sects and are highly impressed by the seemingly knowledgeable and sincere words of their protagonists. Once again the lack of knowledge regarding our authentic scholars and their achievements causes quite a majority of us to feel inferior when faced with such people.

Another point which surprised me very much was the little effort that was being made on the Muslims at the University. It seemed like Da’wah was to be practised on non-Muslims only. I attended one of the meetings held to discuss the organisation of the Islamic Awareness Week at the university. Even though I half expected the meeting to be mixed I had not anticipated what I saw. Many of the sisters wore scarves, but the way they and many of the brothers as well, were dressed, left little to the imagination. However most of these sisters were extremely sincere and it soon became obvious that they played a key role in the running of Islamic events at the university. On asking one of the brothers why this was the case he replied that most Muslim male students did not bother volunteering and consequently this void was filled by the sisters. In my opinion this was an extremely dangerous situation as many of the events that were being organised involved the free mixing of males and females albeit with a good intention. This is another point where most of us fail due to our lack of knowledge and correct guidance. We presume we are doing something acceptable in the Sharee’ah based upon what little knowledge we may have of the Sharee’ah ourselves.

The brother whom I quoted at the beginning of the article was a clean shaven youngster when he started university. He has since kept a beard. I asked him the reason for this and he replied, ‘I was looking for Muslims and I thought let me look for someone with a beard. The thought suddenly hit me that I myself do not have a beard, would anyone recognise me as a Muslim?’ There are many brothers and sisters who dress in full Islamic clothing when attending university and it can be honestly said that there is probably no greater form of giving Da’wah to both Muslims and non-Muslims than this; the full adoption of Islam. As many of us know Allah S has commanded us to enter into Islam totally. This is what I think is needed for the regeneration of the student community. Rather than trying to unify with university culture Muslims need to be unique, unique both internally in manners and character and externally in dress and appearance, and be proud of this uniqueness. Simplicity coupled with the adoption of the teachings of the Qur’an and Sunnah and the ways of the Companions y, under the guidance of the ‘Ulamaa, the experts in the field, seems to be the only way to achieve this uniqueness and in reality restore our confidence. Reliable organisations such as the Islamic Da’wah Academy and many others are already taking part in this regeneration by holding meetings with student leaders and trying to address their specific needs. More interaction such as this is needed at both school and college/university level.

For me university has proved to be quite a revealing experience in the sense that it has made me appreciate how little many non-Muslims and, in some unfortunate cases, Muslims themselves know about Islam. For a significant number of non-Muslim students the only contact they have had with Muslims is via the TV or the newspapers i.e. they have never met a Muslim before. We, as Muslim students need to be trained and given the opportunity to learn how to practice and propagate Islam adequately and to deal with situations which we may have not encountered before in our lives. Only recourse to the ‘Ulamaa and the masha’ikh can help to solve such dilemmas.

We need to take the opportunity to adopt the company of the pious, especially the ‘Ulamaa and take part in reliable religious movements so that we gain the true understanding of Islam. Only then will we become true individuals, independent and free from the shackles of a non-Islamic culture. And only then will we be able to, in the words of the Sahabi Rib’ee Ibne mir t, work towards delivering mankind from ‘the slavery of man into the slavery of the Lord of man, and from the narrowness of this world to the vastness of the Hereafter.’

May Allah S give the writer first and then the readers the ability and the inclination to practice what has been written. May Allah S help all students whether studying in religious or secular institutes to achieve their goals and cause all of us to attain His pleasure and live and die as true Muslims upon Islam. Ameen.

Source: Islamic Da’wah Academy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AND SANCTIFY MY HOUSE

Posted on December 9, 2015 at 7:10 PM Comments comments (0)

AND SANCTIFY MY HOUSE


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ABU BAKR AS-SIDDIQUE

Posted on December 7, 2015 at 9:25 AM Comments comments (0)

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Abu Bakr as-Siddique (ra) - Shaykh Ahmed Ali 

WHAT HAPPENED TO MY YOUTH?

Posted on December 7, 2015 at 9:15 AM Comments comments (0)




 

What has become of my tender youth?

Forsaken to sins and evils is the truth

Given over to pleasure and lust, day and night

Forgive me Allah. I hear and tremble with fright

 

What will happen to me?

Only Allah does know

In Hellfire will I burn

Or receive the Jannah that I yearn

 

Allah, from You forgiveness I seek

And make me amongst the meek

Ya Rabbi show me the way

To live my life as the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) did say

 

And on my deathbed allow me to pray

The kalima, and have me not go astray

From the Siratul Mustakeem

And in Jannah inshallah my face will beam

Ameen.

The First Ten days of Dhul Hijjah

Posted on September 28, 2014 at 6:30 AM Comments comments (0)





The first ten days of Dhul Hijjah are full of virtues and great blessings. According to a large group of mufassireen (commentators of the Qur’aan), the ten nights mentioned in Soorah Al Fajr are the nights of the first ten days of Dhul Hijjah. Allah says:

 

By the Dawn; By the ten Nights; (89:1-2)

 

This oath substantiates the greatness and sacredness of these ten nights in the eyes of Allah. This is an extra ordinary oath; it is very reliable and significant and the wise men can understand that by this oath, Allah too attaches great importance and value to the ten nights of Dhul Hijjah.

 

The Prophet sallallahu alayhi wasallam too, has clearly mentioned the importance and the virtue of these blessed moments. It is reported by Abdullah Ibne Abbaas radhiyallahu anhuma that the Prophet sallallahu alayhi wasallam said, “No good deeds done on other days are superior to those done on these (first ten days of Dhul Hijjah).” Thereupon, some companions of the Prophet sallallahu alayhi wasallam said, “Not even Jihaad ? ” He replied, “Not even jihaad, except that of a man who does it by putting himself and his property in danger (for Allah’s sake) and does not return with any of these things.”

Bukhaari V1 pp132

 

In another Hadeeth reported by Aboo Hurayrah radhiyallahu anhu, the Prophet sallallahu alayhi wasallam said, “On no days is the worship of Allah desired more than in the (first) ten days of Dhul Hijjah. The fast of each of these days is equal to the fast of a whole year, and the worship of each of these nights is equal to the worship of Laylatul Qadr.”

Tirmizi V1 pp58

 

Moreover, what other virtue can be greater for these blessed days than the fact that certain specific devotions cannot be performed but in these specified days. Allah Almighty has specifically chosen these days for the fulfilment of two of the most important devotions, viz. Hajj and Qurbaani.

 

One may argue and say that there are other forms of devotions too, which are fixed to specific days and moments; hence what is the speciality of these particular days ? The answer to this argument is simple. Although there are other devotions too, which are also fixed to specific time, such as fasting in the month of Ramadhaan; but one may, if he desires, fulfil the devotion of fasting in days other than Ramadhaan i.e. as an optional devotion. On the contrary, the wuqoof of Arafaat (which is the essence of Hajj), the wuqoof of Muzdalifah, etc., cannot be performed but in these specified days.

 

If one was to remain in Arafaat for many months after the 9th Dhul Hijjah, he will not receive any reward whatsoever and it will never be considered an act of ibaadah.

 

Similarly, Qurbaani is performed only in three days one of which is 10th Dhul Hijjah. There is no possibility whatsoever of a nafl Qurbaani once these days have lapsed, so much so that qazaa Hajj or qazaa Qurbaani is not even possible. It is because of these distinguishing characteristics that the ulamaa have stated, in the light of Qur’aan and Hadeeth that after the days of the month of Ramadhaan, the greatest days in virtue are the first ten days of Dhul Hijjah.

 

The reward of ibaadah in these days increases abundantly and the results are honoured with specified blessings and mercies by the Creator.

 

ACTS OF VIRTUE

 

There are certain specific acts of virtue in these blessed days of Dhul Hijjah which are enumerated and explained below:

 

1. Upon sighting the moon of Dhul Hijjah, those people intending to perform Qurbaani should neither cut their hair nor clip their nails until the Qurbaani is performed. This is a mustahab (desirable) act derived from Hadeeth of the Prophet sallallahu alayhi wasallam wherein he has said:

 

“A person should neither clip his nails nor cut his hair until he performs qurbaani”.

Ibne Maajah

 

Some ulamaa have explained the reason and wisdom behind this order of the Prophet sallallahu alayhi wasallam thus that in this month, hundreds of thousands of people are blessed with the opportunity of visiting the sacred house of Allah in Makkah.

 

They enjoy the spiritual atmosphere of the holy places and acquire maximum benefit from the blessed moments.

 

Whilst they are there in the state of ihraam certain acts become impermissible for them. Amongst them is clipping of nails and cutting the hair. The Prophet sallallahu alayhi wasallam instructed those of his followers who could not reach the blessed places, to imitate the pilgrims by not cutting the hair and clipping the nails so that the mercy of Allah can enshroud them too together with the pilgrims.

 

2. These days are so blessed that a day’s fast is equivalent to a year’s fast and a night’s devotion is equivalent to the ibaadah of Laylatul Qadr. The indication is towards the fact that we should endeavor to perform as many virtuous acts as possible in these days.

 

3. 9th Dhul Hijjah is the day of Arafah in which the main fardh of Hajj is performed i.e. wuqoof Arafah. This is a great moment for the pilgrims when the Mercy of Allah descends upon them in abundance and their sins are forgiven and du’aa accepted. Allah, through His Compassion and Mercy, has not deprived the non-pilgrims of his mercy, but rather, shown the way to His Pleasure. The Prophet sallallahu alayhi wasallam was asked about the fast of the day of Arafah. He said, “It compensates for the (minor) sins of the past and the coming year.”

Ibne Maajah

 

Note: One should take note that the sins forgiven are minor sins. The major sins are not forgiven without tawbah.

 

4. The reciting of Takbeeraate Tashreeq after every fardh Salaat from the Fajr of 9th Dhul Hijjah to the Asr of 13th Dhul Hijjah (i.e. total of twenty three fardh Salaat). It is waajib upon men to recite this takbeer once after every fardh Salaat audibly. The women should recite it silently.

 

5. The Sunnah of Ibraahem alayhi salaam – the Qurbaani. It is to be performed on 10th, 11th or 12th Dhul Hijjah. One may sacrifice a thousand animals on days other than these, but it will never be regarded or considered a Qurbaani.

 

Here, a believer is taught a great lesson that an action or a place or a time does not hold any virtue in itself; but rather it is Allah’s command and order that changes the status, level and grade of things. Regarding Qurbaani, the Prophet sallallahu alayhi wasallam said:

“There is nothing dearer to Allah during the days of Qurbaani than the sacrificing of animals. The sacrificed animal shall come on the Day of Judgement with its horn, hair, and hooves (to be weighed). The sacrifice is accepted by Allah before the blood reaches the ground. Therefore sacrifice with an open and happy heart.”

Tirmizi V1 pp275, Ibne Maajah V1 pp226

 

May Allah ta’aalaa bless us with spiritual gains and His Pleasure in these blessed moments. Aameen.



Shaykh Maulana Saleem Dhorat

Ihram

Posted on September 28, 2014 at 6:20 AM Comments comments (0)





Ihrâm literally means to make something harâm upon oneself. By adopting ihrâm (donning the two sheets, making niyat and reciting the talbiya, certain things which were halâl (allowed) now become harâm (not allowed) upon that person. Thus, we can say that ihrâm is a state (condition) which a person has subjected himself to and he can reverse this state only if particular rites are performed.

 

Furthermore, the two sheets a Haji or Mu’tamir wears is also called ihrâm because it reflects ones intention and status.

 

Once a person adopts an ihrâm, it must not be ended abrubtly without completing the intended haj or umra. This applies even if a person has committed an act which will render his ihrâm fâsid.

 

However;

 

if a muhrim was unable to make wuqûf of Arafah, he should then perform the acts of umra and terminate such an ihrâm.

if a muhrim is prevented from performing haj or umra, than such a muhrim can end the state of ihrâm by offering a sacrifice within the boundaries of the haram.

It is wâjib to perform the Qadha of any ihrâm terminated without performing the rites of the intended hajj or Umra.

CONDITIONS OF IHRÂM:

 

To be a Muslim.

To form an intention and to recite the talbiya or any other zikr that is an acceptable substitute for the talbiya.

WÂJIBÂT OF IHRÂM:

 

To adopt ihrâm from the miqât.

To stay away from that which is prohibited in ihrâm.

SUNAN OF IHRÂM:

 

To perform ghusl or wudhu.

To apply itr before making an intention for the Ihrâm of Haj or Umrah.

To use two sheets as the dress for ihrâm.

To perform two rakâts salâh as sunnat of ihrâm.

To recite the talbiya as reported in the hadith .

To recite it loudly.

To recite it thrice.


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